Law of Nature & Civil Law

I.

Nationality determines the political status of an individual, nationality determines allegiance.

Domicile determines civil status.

For example, a foreign national can not vote but is liable for a crime.

II.

A person born to foreign national(s) has divergent allegiance and civil status.

For example, from the Naturalization Act of 1790 until today, a child born abroad to US citizen parents is a US citizen – the nationality, the political status, of the child follows that of the parent.

The civil status of that child is, like that of the parents, determined by domicile.

Thus: A native born person’s allegiance and civil status may be divergent. The citizenship may be foreign, although not necessarily, and the civil status is determined by domicile.

III.

A person born in country to US citizen parents is a US citizen, the political status of the child follows that of the parent.

The civil status of that child is, like that of the parents, determined by domicile.

Allegiance and civil status coincide.

Thus: The law of nature and civil law coincide.

A natural born citizen is by law of nature (jus sanguinus) and civil law (jus soli).

 

 

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